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Extra Credit Opportunities +10 on 4th Six Weeks Test

 

 

Parent/ legal guardian volunteer for guest judging at LPHS on Friday February 8th for the Regional Academic Decathlon Meet.

 

Adult must be willing to come to La Porte High school from 4:00-8.45 pm. You will be chosen to either listen to speeches or conduct simple interviews with one or two other judges and mark a scores on a score sheet, we will train you right before the event starts from 4.00-4.30. You will be hearing from students from Pearland, Clear Lake, Pasadena, North Shore, Deer Park, La Porte, Friendswood and surrounding areas.

 

Our school Culinary Arts program will have a dinner provided for you and you will get 25 min to eat.

Email me and I will add your list for the Regional Coordinator to add you to the email list for scheduling and documentation.

If you have any adult family or co-workers that could help it would be appreciated.

 

Thank You!

hw 1/14

Questions: Protestant Reformation Crash Course #218

Directions: Watch the video “World History Crash Course #218: Luther and the Protestant Reformation” on www.youtube.com and answer the questions below on a separate piece of paper.

  1. In what ways did the Catholic Church dominate European civilization during the Middle Ages?
  2. Briefly describe Martin Luther’s background. How did his experiences make him the perfect candidate to lead the Reformation of the Church?
  3. What did Luther believe was the key to earning salvation?
  4. Why did Luther write his Ninety-Five Theses?
  5. What ideas did Luther teach that put him at odds with the pope and the Church?
  6. What was the Diet of Worms and why was Luther called before it in 1521?
  7. Why was Luther deemed more of a threat to the Church than the dissenting theologians that preceded him in challenging Church beliefs?
  8. Why did the German peasants revolt in 1525? How did this revolt end? How did Luther feel about the fact that the peasants’ justified their rebellion by using many of his theological teachings?
  9. Why did the German princes choose to adopt Lutheranism even though the Holy Roman Emperor had forbidden it?
  10. According to host John Green, what has been the most crucial effect of the Protestant Reformation?

Chapter 16: Social and Economic Life

Chapter 16: Social and Economic Life

The Bourgeoisie:

               Imported exotic luxury products

               Caribbean’s and Brazil:

               Mexico:

               Virginia:

               North America

               East Indian Island:

               China:

The most egalitarian European country:

Holland was free from the ________________ and religious ______________ imposed by political and ___________________ authorities elsewhere

Joint stock companies:

Stock exchanges:

With government support the English government support the English merchant fleet ______________ from _______________.

               Foreign trade rose by _______________

English government used naval __________to break ______________ dominance in overseas _______________

Gentry:

 

 

The Counter Reformation

1. The Catholic Church met at _____________ to reaffirm the supremacy of the ______________.
2. This meeting reaffirmed salvation through faith and _______________.
3. This meeting called for seminaries (religious schools) to ____________priests.
4. The Society of Jesus or the "__________________", was started by Ignatius ______________. 
5. The Counter Reformation was also known as the:
6. Well educated _______________ helped limit the gains made by ______________.
7. These Catholic priests went on missions to these three areas:
8. This nation used its newly acquired vast wealth to attack Protestants instead  of investing in their own economy:
9. In France, King _____________ accepted the _____________ faith.
10.  The Edict of Nantes was revoked by him, this document had granted:
11. The King of England ___________________ failed to obtain a papal ____________________ of his marriage. In protest he broke with Rome and was made the head of the ______________________.
12. The _____________ Church distanced itself from Catholic _____________ and _______________.
13. Some wanted to purify the Church of England from all Catholic influences, they were known as:

Chapter 16: Culture and Ideas

1. What was the Renaissance? What building symbolized it?
2. What is an indulgence?
3. Who pointed out perceived corruption of the Catholic Church? Who did he write?
4. What is a papal bull?
5. What did Luther accuse the Catholic Church of relying on for salvation?
6. What did Luther insist was the only way to salvation?
7. What technology spread his views?
8. How did nationalism impact/ spread the teaching of Luther?
9. Calvin viewed salvation as a __________ of God given to those who were "___________________".
10. What changes did Calvinists bring to churches?
 

KongoKingAffonso

Read article. There is a 13 minute video of me reading and explaining the reading to you to help you.
Respond to the following on a separate sheet of paper. 
 
This goes with Document 14.3 "King Alfonso I" Questions (Responses should be 2 complete sentences per question):
1. According to King Alfonso, how had the Portuguese connection in general and the slave trade in particular transformed his state?
2. To what extent did Alfonso seek the end of the slave trade? What was the basis for his opposition to it? Do you think he was opposed to slavery itself?
3. What did Alfonso seek from Portugal? What kind of relationship did he envisage with the Portuguese?
 

mc 14.2

Chapter 14.2

 

  1. The Turkish conquest of northern India was aided by

a.

bronze cannon.

b.

muskets.

c.

crossbows.

d.

epidemic disease.

e.

Indian rebellions.


 

 

 

  1. Sultan Iltutmish passed his empire to Raziya, his

a.

daughter.

b.

eldest son.

c.

youngest son.

d.

adviser.

e.

regent.


 

 

 

  1. The most significant factor contributing to agriculture in the Delhi Sultanate was

a.

slave labor on sugar plantations.

b.

a switch to the three-field crop rotation system.

c.

the use of swidden agricultural practices.

d.

extensive irrigation canals.

e.

staple crops, including cucumbers and melons.

 

 

 

  1. When the Delhi Sultanate began to lose control of its realm, new kingdoms emerged in India called Bahmani in the Deccan plateau and this kingdom in the southern states of the Indian subcontinent:

a.

Siam.

b.

Sind.

c.

Vijayanagar.

d.

Gujarat.

e.

Assam.


 

 

  1. Sultan Muhammed ibn Tughluq was noted by Chronicler Ibn Battuta as being remarkable for his

a.

extravagance

b.

religious toleration

c.

passion for justice through Shar'ia

d.

alienation of the Brahmins

e.

establishment of a Quranic school at his Hall of a Thousand Pillars

 

 

  1. For all of its shortcomings, the Delhi Sultanate triggered the development of

a.

reliable and safe water supply to the region.

b.

new irrigation system of qanats to the region.

c.

safe haven for religious exiles.

d.

centralized political authority to India.

e.

new unifying religion in the form of Islam.

 

 

 

  1. Which of the following helped to increase Indian Ocean trade between 1200 and 1500?

a.

The collapse of the Mongol Empire, which disrupted the overland trade routes.

b.

Increased demand for luxury goods such as jewels, fine textiles, and precious metals.

c.

The rising prosperity of Asian, European, and African states, which stimulated expansion.

d.

The construction of larger ships, making shipping cargo more profitable.

e.

All of the above.

 

 

 

  1. The characteristic ship of the Arabian Sea was the

a.

galley.

b.

junk.

c.

skow.

d.

caravel.

e.

dhow.


 

 

 

  1. The largest, most technologically advanced, and most seaworthy ship in the Indian Ocean was the Chinese

a.

galley.

b.

junk.

c.

skow.

d.

dhow.

e.

caravel.


 

 

 

  1. Rather than political authorities, the different regional networks of the Indian Ocean trade were tied together by

a.

commercial interests.

b.

political authority.

c.

religious authority.

d.

a common language.

e.

the threat of Chinese intrusion.

 

 

 

  1. By 1250 the most important trading city of the Swahili Coast was

a.

Cairo.

b.

Kilwa.

c.

Timbuktu.

d.

Casablanca.

e.

Johannesburg.


 

 

 

  1. The economic and political power of Great Zimbabwe was based on long-distance trade in

a.

gold, copper, and salt.

b.

silk, porcelain, and iron.

c.

olives, wheat, and pepper.

d.

books, wool, and wine.

e.

qurans, ink, and wheat.

 

 

 

  1. What caused the collapse of the empire of Great Zimbabwe?

a.

monsoon flooding

b.

conquest by Christian Ethiopians

c.

deforestation and cattle overgrazing

d.

prolonged drought that killed agriculture

e.

The order of Sultan Muhammed ibn Tughluq that the city be abandoned

 

 

 

  1. Why has Aden thrived commercially since ancient times?

a.

favorable maritime winds

b.

mutual tolerance of diverse religions

c.

geostrategic location

d.

favorable rainfall for drinking water

e.

all of these

 

 

 

  1. What was unique about Gujarat trade compared to African and Arabic?

a.

Gujarat manufactured goods for trade

b.

Gujarat required non-Hindu traders to pay a special tariff

c.

Gujarat was significantly inland

d.

Gujarat had artisanal guilds that dictated trade standards

e.

Gujarat refused trade with the European states

 

 

 

 

Chapter 14 HW due 12/5

Chapter 14 - Southern Empires, Southern Seas, 1200-1500

 

 

  1. The tropics are warm all year round. The center of the tropical zone is marked by the

a.

polar caps.

b.

Gulf Stream.

c.

equator.

d.

Sahara Desert.

e.

none of these.


 

  1. The rainy and dry seasons in the Indian Ocean reflect the influence of alternating winds known as

a.

the monsoons.

b.

the jet stream.

c.

the Gulf Stream.

d.

"El Niño".

e.

the Himalayas.


 

  1. By 1200 human migrations had spread many useful plants and animals from the Indo-Malayan region to Africa, including

a.

bananas, yams, and cocoyams.

b.

corn, beans, and squash.

c.

wheat, millet, and barley.

d.

rice, kiwi, and manioc.

e.

tea, spelt, and barley.

 

  1. The form of extensive agriculture that was used in sub-Saharan Africa is characterized as

a.

hunting and gathering.

b.

marginal cultivation.

c.

intensive cultivation.

d.

shifting cultivation.

e.

selective cultivation.

 

  1. The greatest network of irrigation canals between the 14-19th century was found in the Delhi Sultanate of

a.

Ceylon.

b.

Great Zimbabwe.

c.

Mali.

d.

China.

e.

India.


 

  1. The Tuareg were

a.

Islamic missionaries who reached the sub-Saharan region.

b.

traders from the caravans between Arabia and Libya.

c.

western Saharan pastoralists and caravan guides.

d.

herders of camels and llamas in the Gold Coast region.

e.

descendants of the Dutch in South Africa.

 

  1. The most abundant metal worked in the tropics was

a.

bronze.

b.

titanium.

c.

iron.

d.

silver.

e.

platinum.


 

 

 

  1. Which of the following is not true of pastoralists?

a.

The milk of their animals was more important than the meat.

b.

Pastoral groups in India were less numerous.

c.

Pastoralism did not allow for extensive cultivation.

d.

The largest concentration of pastoralists in the world was in northeastern Africa and Arabia.

e.

All of the above.

 

  1. The empires of Mali in West Africa and of Delhi in South Asia both utilized

a.

Islamic administration.

b.

papal administration.

c.

Orthodox Buddhist administration.

d.

a scholar bureaucracy.

e.

the electoral system.

 

  1. The spread of Islam through the Sahara was by conquest while the spread of Islam to lands south of the Sahara came about through

a.

war.

b.

forced conversion.

c.

a gradual and peaceful process of conversion through increasing commercial contacts.

d.

the missionary efforts of the Arabs during the Umayyad Caliphate.

e.

the travels of Ibn Battuta.

 

  1. According to Malinke legends, the founder of Mali was

a.

a Shi'ite imam.

b.

Marco Polo.

c.

Sundiata.

d.

Sumanguru.

e.

Agamemnon.


 

  1. Mali derived significant income from

a.

shifting agriculture trade with Yoruba

b.

the slave trade with Portugal.

c.

control of gold and copper trade with North African Muslim traders.

d.

coffee trade with Ethopia.

e.

glass trade with Benin.

 

  1. Mansa Kankan Musa, the ruler of Mali, made a famous pilgrimage that

a.

spread Christianity to West Africa.

b.

demonstrated the enormous wealth of his country.

c.

led to the Christian Crusades.

d.

was inspired by the death of Muhammad.

e.

brought about his untimely death.

 

  1. In addition to fulfilling his personal religious obligations, Mansa Kankan Musa's pilgrimage resulted in the

a.

disappearance of Buddhist practice in Mali.

b.

decrease in Malian taxes.

c.

contraction of the Malian economy.

d.

construction of new mosques and Quranic schools in Mali.

e.

conversion of all Malians to Islam.

 

 

 

  1. Afghan and Turkish invaders were able to successfully invade India because of

a.

the threats of Mongol Il-khans.

b.

a desire to spread the Islamic faith and to acquire plunder.

c.

the prospect of learning Indian technology and mathematics.

d.

the division of India into warring small states.

e.

all of these.

 

 

The Hundred Years War-student 2015

Latin West: Political and Military Transformations

 Directions: Use the following to fill-out your notes. I give discuss these notes in class Friday  and Monday (for about 20 minutes). We will quiz the rest of the time on Monday.

 

Monarchs, Nobles, and the Church

 

Kingdoms led: by monarchs who were limited by the nobles below them whose support and advice they needed

 

The Church: also one of the most important institutions of the time

 

Towns: especially in Italy and Germany, guarded their independence

 

The backbone of the fighting force: the medieval knight, wealthy men who were able to afford horses and were able to have the free time to train to fight

 

Their role challenged by

  1. Crossbow, could pierce armor! A commoner trained to use this weapon could now kill a noblemen with ease and at a distance far enough before his life ever in any real danger
  2. Early firearms, also the role of nights but also diminished the importance of the once mighty castle

 

The Church Challenges the kings

 

Pope Boniface VIII (r.1294-1303): pope superior to every human creature-including kings,

King Phillip of France: rejected this Pope, had him arrested and appointed his own pope!

            The Babylonian Captivity of The Church (1309-1376): period 7 popes handpicked by France and themselves French

            Avignon: location of these popes

  Great Western Schism (1378-1415): two popes, one in Rome and one in France,

            Excommunication: threatened on one another, antipopes, ends finally

 

England

            Expanded influence: to Ireland, Scotland, and wales

            King John (r.1199-1216): magna Carta 1215, king subject to law, independence of church, nobles rights

 

 

The Hundred Years War (1337 to 1453)

conflict between: England and France, lasting 116 years from

claims by the English kings to: the French throne

gave impetus to ideas of both: French and English nationality

 

new weapons and tactics: eroded the older system of feudal armies dominated by heavy cavalry

revival of standing armies: in Western Europe since the time of the Western Roman Empire were introduced for the war,

changing the role of: the peasantry

 

France and England’s nobility were tied: since William the Conqueror’s invasion of England in 1066 (The Norman Invasion)

 

Since the Norman conquest, English rulers were: tied to France as vassals

Upon the death of the French Charles IV: (leaving only daughters and an unborn son), English Edward III the closet relative

French unwilling to:  recognize a foreign  king

 

 

Joan of Arc (1429): English gains were limited by the leadership of Joan of Arc at the Battle of Orleans, Captured by the English and burned as a witch, 1431

 

The longbow: Foot soldiers were commoners, Quickly trained, Hit targets 200 yards away

 

Battle of Agincourt (1415): Henry V led his forces of 6-9000 English verse 15000-36000 French, Terrain an advantage for the English, Knee deep mud, French knights

 

English losses: approx. 450

French losses: in the thousands, constable, three dukes, five counts and 90 barons

 

Decline of heavy cavalry: with introduction of longbow, Decline in the importance of mounted nobility (knights)

Rise of nationalism: in France and England

 

 

New Monarchies of France and England: centralization of power, boundaries fixed, national identity

Rise in England: of Parliament

to meet with him to: consent to new taxes

Composed of:  two houses, Both houses worked to pass laws

House of Lords: Nobles and church lords

House of Commons: Knights and townspeople

 

Limits in France

The Estates General: Philip IV created a three fold French parliament in 1302

Represented the three estates: or classes

Clergy (first estate)

Nobles (second estate)

Townspeople (third estate)

 

Was only: an advising body

Was only called into session: when the king needed funds approved

Iberian Unification (The Reconquista)

Christian began in the 11th century to retake the Iberian Peninsula back from Muslim forces who had invaded it in the 8th century, he had been call Al-Andalus

 

1415, Christian forces even took the North African city of Ceuta, exposing them to the wealth of the Muslim trade with Sub-Saharan Africa

1469 marriage of Isabella of Castile and Ferdinand of Aragon united two regions of Spain

 

Last region of Spain, Granada taken from Muslim forces in 1492

 

1492 The Jews who refused to convert and assimilate to a new officially Catholic Span were kicked out

1492: Ferdinand and Isabella sponsored Columbus

1502: all Muslims who refused to convert were kicked out

            Loss of Jews and Muslims represented massive loss of intellectuals

            The Spanish Inquisition would have trials for those who held questionable beliefs that challenged Catholic teachings

Sometimes torture was used, death penalty was rare

            Trials from 1540-1700: 44,701with 826 killed; rate of executions at1.8%

 

The Ottoman Frontier

As Muslims lost control of the Iberian Peninsula in Western Europe, they gained control of territory in Eastern Europe by conquering Christian territory in the Balkan Peninsula

 

Enslaving captured enemies was allowed in Islam

Janissaries- Christian prisoners were enslaved and converted to Islam

            Embraced the use of guns as foot soldiers, something that the Turkic Muslims, who were skilled horsemen, rejected as undignified

The 15 century saw the introduction of the devshirme, a regular selection of Christians who were to report as soldiers for the Ottoman Empire

            Placed in Turkish families and adopted Islam and the Turkish language

            Were noted as excellent slave-soldiers

hw CC-The Renaissance due 11/29

Crash Course World History: The Renaissance
Directions: While watching John Greene’s You Tube video about the Renaissance, answer the questions with the information as it is provided.
1) What two cultures were “rediscovered” during the Italian Renaissance?
2) What two areas of life or culture could we see these ancient “ideas” imitated?
3) What did humanists spend their time and energy studying? (provide some specific examples)
4) Why were the cities of Milan, Florence and Venice so wealthy during the 1400 and 1500s? How did this promote the Renaissance?
5) How did the Medici family get so rich, powerful and famous?
6) Besides trade, what role did the Muslim world play in helping start the Renaissance?
7) What was John Greene’s main point in his argument that the Renaissance didn’t occur?
8) Do you agree or disagree with his argument? (provide your rationale)